Facebook Posted Notice of Accuracy on a News Website

Facebook Posted Notice of Accuracy on a News Website

Facebook has taken several steps to prevent fraudulent news, but it has never before been reported that a post has been faked at the behest of a government.

For the first time, Facebook posted notice of accuracy on a news website post on the Singapore government's directive, and for the first time, the new Singapore Fake News rules were applied outside the border.

The Singapore government said in a post on the News Site Status Review that they were abusive allegations. The post accuses the Singapore government of electoral fraud and the arrest of a man who allegedly exposed him.

Singapore's government had previously instructed the site's editor, Alex Tan, to correct the post, but an Australian citizen had refused to obey a foreign government order.

Alex Tan was born in Singapore, but now lives and resides in Australia, and in a follow-up post he wrote that he would continue to resist and violate unfair law. He posted this article on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google Docs and challenged the government to show it right there.

The note posted on Facebook posted on the site said, "We are legally bound to inform you that the Singapore government says that the details of this post are false." This note is below the original post and can only be viewed by social media users in Singapore.

In a statement, Facebook said it had put the label under the Fake News Act.

This law came into force in October.

According to Facebook's Transparency Report, the company continues to block content that is considered a violation of local laws by governments around the world, and around 18,000 such requests worldwide from January to June this year. Received.

Facebook's Asian head office is in Singapore and says it is expected that the law will not affect freedom of expression.

Anyone who violates this law can face heavy fines and up to 5 years in prison.

Under the law, bots that spread fake accounts or fake news will be banned, while fined $ 1 million and up to 10 years in prison.

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